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Black-Operated Brands You Can Support Today

Put Your Money Where the Movement Is: Black-Operated Brands You Can Support Today

In response to the murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and so many others, people across the United States have started speaking out against police brutality in Black communities. The past few weeks have seen protests in every state in America and in at least 40 countries around the world, countless petitions to get justice for Black Americans who have been killed by the police, and crowdsourced lists of organizations to donate to. As the initial wave of protests subsides, many people have been wondering how they can continue to fight against racial disparities in this country.

Black-Operated Brands You Can Support Today

In addition to keeping this necessary conversation going even as the media cycle focuses less on the protests, a great way to help ensure that Black communities receive the reparations they deserve is to support Black-owned and Black-operated businesses. Whether you physically go to businesses in your community or you support businesses across the country by shopping online, you can fight inequality in the long-term by putting your money where your mouth is and giving Black businesses your hard-earned cash. There are 30.2 million small businesses in the U.S. and all it takes is a simple Google search to discover which of these are owned and run by Black entrepreneurs. To get you started, here is just a small list of some of our favorite Black-owned and Black-operated brands.

Castamira Swimwear

Castamira Swimwear - Black-Operated Brands You Can Support Today

Chantel Davis, a Jamaican-born model, founded this luxury swimwear brand in 2017 and hasn’t stopped her entrepreneurial efforts since. Davis wants Castamira to be a swimwear company for all women, regardless of their size, shape, or skin color. Before she founded the brand, Davis went to university and then signed with Wilhelmina Miami to work as a model for three years.

After seeing the same thin body type over and over again in the modeling industry, Davis was inspired to launch a swimwear brand that aimed to make all women feel comfortable, sexy, and confident in their own skin. Davis designs Castamira swimsuits so that they highlight the small of the back, support the bust, embrace curves, and elongate legs. Every inch of these swimsuits is catered to the female form so that any woman can have fun in the sun while feeling undeniably beautiful.

The Doux

The Doux Haircare

The Doux is a professional approach to curly hair that delivers real results without all of the hype. Maya Smith, a licensed cosmetologist, developed The Doux in a textured hair salon with extensive research and development and thousands of transitioned clients. Smith developed The Doux to treat any style of hair, whether it has natural curl definition or it’s been thermally straightened. With Smith’s innovative product, she’s squashed the battle between straight and curly and proved that any kind of natural is beautiful.

Black Girl Sunscreen

Shontay Lundy's Black Girl Sunscreen

Shontay Lundy created Black Girl Sunscreen in 2016 to help Black people protect their skin against harmful UV rays. Lundy formulated this sunscreen specifically for darker skin tones so that it doesn’t leave a white residue or cast after you apply it. Whether you love laying out on the beach or you’re among the 162 million people who make up the U.S. civilian labor force and spend your working hours out in the sun, you can use this sunscreen to protect your skin. It is also reef-friendly, as it is made with an all-natural formula free of harmful parabens and fragrances.

JustFab

Black-Operated Brands You Can Support Today

JustFab is a fashion-subscription e-commerce site that provides members with a personal shopping experience and is part of TechStyle Fashion Group’s portfolio of brands, which also includes Savage X Fenty, Fabletics, and ShoeDazzle. Daria Burke helps ensure JustFab’s success as their Chief Marketing Officer (CMO). In this position, Burke oversees all marketing functions and pilots JustFab’s global brand awareness and positioning.

Prior to joining JustFab in 2019, Burke led various fashion and retail advertising partnerships at Facebook and Instagram; was a founding team member of Rent the Runway, and served as Head of Beauty Strategy, Innovation, and Experience at CVS. Although Burke is early in her career at JustFab, she is sure to give the fashion brand a boost with her extensive expertise. Bet you didn’t know, JustFab was a Black-operated brand.

Mielle Haircare

Mielle Haircare

With a focus on health from the inside out, Mielle products have shaken up the hair care market since the company’s 2014 launch. Monique Rodriguez is the company’s founder and CEO and used her nine years of experience as a registered nurse to create a line of natural beauty products for all hair types. At an affordable price, you won’t need to pawn precious stones to get the cash you need to purchase Mielle products. You can easily find these natural products at major stores like Walmart or purchase them online to support Rodriguez and her business directly.

Glam Body

Danika Berry's Glam Body

Danika Berry created Glam Body in 2017 with the goal of making skin look and feel better with natural ingredients. Glam Body’s coffee scrubs are vegan and cruelty-free, containing jojoba oil, coconut oil, and coffee. This combination of ingredients helps fight stretch marks, cellulite, hyperpigmentation, eczema, dull skin, and aging effects.

French Deal

French Deal Mens Fashion

Steeven Kodjia started in a competition-winning dance crew at the O’Tentick dance company, a Parisian-based dance studio. While he performed at concerts and in music videos, he developed a strong interest in men’s fashion. After frequent trips to New York City to search for streetwear styles he couldn’t find elsewhere, he decided to start his own fashion label, French Deal.

French Deal is based on Parisian hip-hop looks and VOLUME 4, Steeven’s latest collection, aims to shine a positive light on Africa. With this collection, Steeven wants to challenge stereotypical beliefs to prove that Africa has an amazing fashion scene with a rich history and culture.

Glow by Daye

Glow by Daye Hair Tools

Glow by Daye is a brand that sells high-quality hair maintenance tools and products to help you meet your hair goals. Ranay Orton, a self-proclaimed lazy natural, wanted simple solutions to care for her hair and didn’t find them on the market. So, she created her own. Whether your hair goals are focused on length, moisture retention, or prolonging hairstyles, Orton’s products are designed to help you.

Rucker Roots

Rucker Roots Haircare

Sisters Ellen Rucker Sellers and Ione Rucker-Jamison launched Rucker Roots, a line of healthy products to help all hair types. Their products are derived from vegetable roots, such as ginger root, carrot root, and turnip root. You can shop the Rucker Roots collection for individual shampoos and conditioners or for multi-step systems to boost your hair’s health.

Whether you want to treat yourself to a piece of luxury fashion or you’re looking for affordable products to use in your daily life, you can support Black businesses. Use these companies as a starting point and remember to share your favorite brands with your friends and family. By creating a network of financial support for Black-operated businesses and recognizing the achievements of Black entrepreneurs, we can help Black communities thrive.

Business.org $100 gift card giveaway

Business.org Support Local Restaurants With Gift Card Giveaways

We always champion supporting small businesses; Small Business Saturday is a favorite of ours, but during this uncertain time, supporting them is needed more than ever. Of course, due to unemployment, our budgets are not what they were, so Business.org is stepping in to help. Business.org wants to help out local restaurants by purchasing $5,000 worth of gift cards and gifting them to you to support your favorite restaurants.

Business.org $100 gift card giveaway

To give small businesses a quick cash infusion during the Covid-19 shutdown (and help us put food on our table), Business.org is offering a total of $5,000 toward local cuisine. How does it work? They have purchased 50 gift cards valued at $100 each and asking you to submit the name of your favorite restaurants; from the entries, they will randomly select the winners and send them a $100 gift card for the restaurant they nominated. We have selected our favorite from our neighborhood and pray to god we are selected. Who will you be nominating as your favorite?

We love this idea as it is a fantastic way to help out local businesses; this small boost will help them, and of course, you (who doesn’t need the extra grocery budget). There are rules for entering of course. Anyone 18 years or older, located in any of the 50 states, can submit a local restaurant for nomination. Only one restaurant or small business can be nominated, so be sure to select your top favorite. Submitting your name enters you into the drawing for a $100 gift card that Business.org will purchase from the local restaurant of your choice.

You must hurry though as the nominations are only open until April 30th at 5 pm MST; that’s 7 pm EST to you fellow East coasters. Click on THIS NOMINATION FORM to fill out your favorite small business. All winners will be contacted via email on May 4th, 2020.

Nail Salon

Ohio Spa Owner Under Fire For Naming Nail Salon ‘Inappropriately’

Jobs. A necessary evil. That is, of course, unless your job doesn’t feel like day-to-day toil. A poll taken in 2016 referred to Millennials as the job hopping generation, with six in 10 open to a new job at any given time. This is a greater number than any previous generation.

While that fact has drawn criticism from older generations, younger people are much more likely not to suffer through doing a job they hate. A concept that doesn’t compute to certain mindsets. A way to avoid disliking your job is to start your own business. Sure, it’s tough at first, but you’re ultimately in charge of what happens, for good or for ill. Plus, you get to name your own business.

Ohio resident Dawn Moon is a new business owner. The licensed cosmetologist recently opened her nail salon and spa that has since caused quite the scene. The value of on-site signage is equal to 24 full-page newspaper ads each year. For Moon, this wasn’t enough, so she took her marketing acumen and opened Pandora’s Box by officially naming her nail salon Hand Jobs Nails & Spa.

So many reactions. Outrage. Offense. Laughs. Viral marketing. Her spa, in just a few days, is on the map internationally.

“You don’t want something that they can’t remember or that they can’t pronounce or say. In less than a week, I think the whole country knows about us. You can’t pay for that kind of advertising,” she explained.

Phenomenally clever. She goes on to defend the name because it’s literally the establishment’s job to work on hands. Still, some residents of the town are outraged over the name and have appealed to the zoning board to force Moon to change the name of her spa. She’s prepared to fight it tooth-and-nail.

“If you go in and get your nose done, it’s called a nose job right? Well you come in and get your hands done it’s a hand job!” she argues.

She’s certainly not wrong and whichever way the verdict turns out, she already got enough free marketing out of it for the whole ordeal to be worth it. The spa has reportedly received more compliments and jokes about it than ire, but it only takes one “I want to talk to a manager!” type to get the authorities involved.

The decision of whether Hand Jobs Nails & Spa remains named thusly is forthcoming and if they’re told to change the name, appeals will be filed and it’ll be taken to court, reports say.

Some 99% of marketers swear by the unique value of trade show exhibits that aren’t found in traditional marketing mediums. We might suggest they take a lesson from Dawn Moon and harness the unique advantage of knowing the viral content market and thoroughly exploiting the attention span of the internet and the collective reach of a little PG-13 humor.

Now, who’s ready for a manicure?